Category Archives: Resources

Low Income in Canada (statcan paper)

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/75f0002m2012001-eng.pdf

Income Research Paper Series

Low Income in Canada: a Multi-line and Multi-index Perspective

by Brian Murphy, Xuelin Zhang and Claude Dionne

Income Statistics Division
Jean Talon Building, 170 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6
Telephone: 1-613-951-7355
Catalogue no. 75F0002M — No. 001
ISSN 1707-2840
ISBN 978-1-100-19895-8
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How Canada Performs on Child Poverty

The Conference Board of Canada provides details and analysis on Canadian society.

They give Canada a C” on Child Poverty (follow this link for details).

Of note: The Conference Board of Canada uses the OECD’s relative measure of child poverty,which calculates the proportion of children living in households where disposable income is less than 50 per cent of the median in each country.

How will we as Anglicans in the Diocese of Ottawa define Child Poverty so that we can best engage in ministry and advocacy?

Living Justice: A Gospel Response to Poverty

Living Justice: A Gospel Response to Poverty  is a book for Christian faith communities trying to live out the justice mandate to love the stranger, the widow, and the orphan, and to seek just relations within society. It is a resource for people interested in learning more about the situation of poverty in Canada, exploring the Christian call to respond, and searching for ways to engage and create change. It includes reflections, discussion questions, activities, and prayers that will provide insight into the situation of poverty in Canada, the challenges and opportunities we face as a society, and actions that we, as Christians, can take.

The Task Force has limited copies for review, or you can order your own copy at the CPJ website. Look for articles by Andrew Stephens-Rennie and the Reverend Dr Linda Privitera. Your reviews of this book and comments below are most welcome.

Ottawa Neighbourhood Study

The Ottawa Neighbourhood Study is an extremely valuable resource for parishes, ministries and groups in the city of Ottawa who want to know more about the neihbourhoods they serve. Look up your neighbourhood today.

Ottawa’s Poverty Reduction Strategy

Available at http://ottawa.ca/doc_repository/reports/prs_en.pdf

The Child Poverty Task Force invites you to read this report and offer comments below. How might this relate to responses from parishes and ministries of the Diocese of Ottawa? In particular, it would be good to know if anyone is aware of a similar strategies in the other municipalities we serve (Cornwall, Pembroke, Gatineau, and points in between).

Breaking the Cycle: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy

Available at http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/breakingthecycle/report/index.aspx

The Child Poverty Task Force invites you to read this report and offer comments below. How might this relate to responses from parishes and ministries of the Diocese of Ottawa? In particular, it would be good to know if anyone is aware of a similar strategy in the province of Quebec.

Book: Persistent Poverty

Available at
http://www.btlbooks.com/bookinfo.php?index=214

Persistent Poverty: voices from the margins
Jamie Swift, Brice Balmer and Mira Dineen

“It’s a very short trip from the limousine seat to the curb.” Jim Mann never missed a payroll for the dozen men who worked for his flourishing landscaping business he built from the ground up. Now he lives hand-to-mouth. His pockets are empty long before his next social assistance cheque arrives.

In early 2010 over two hundred civic and faith leaders fanned out into thirty Ontario communities. Their goal? To explore how the least fortunate people in one of the world’s richest places are faring.

The Interfaith Social Assistance Reform Coalition’s latest social audit exposed a tattered social assistance system run by volunteers desperately struggling to fill the gaps. There can be no papering over the savage inequalities and suffering exposed in this compelling look at life from the margins.

We’d appreciate your comments and thoughts. Please add them below.